Introduction to tree ring dating

For the entire period of a tree's life, a year-by-year record or ring pattern is formed that reflects the climatic conditions in which the tree grew.

Adequate moisture and a long growing season result in a wide ring. Alternating poor and favorable conditions, such as mid summer droughts, can result in several rings forming in a given year.

In 1859, the German-American Jacob Kuechler (1823–1893) used crossdating to examine oaks (Quercus stellata) in order to study the record of climate in western Texas.Each ring marks a complete cycle of seasons, or one year, in the tree's life.In his Trattato della Pittura (Treatise on Painting), Leonardo da Vinci was the first person to mention that trees form rings annually and that their thickness is determined by the conditions under which they grew. S., Alexander Catlin Twining (1801–1884) suggested in 1833 that patterns among tree rings could be used to synchronize the dendrochronologies of various trees and thereby to reconstruct past climates across entire regions. Meeting on Stable Isotopes in Tree-Ring Research, Proc., New Paltz, New York, 22− (in the press). If your browser does not accept cookies, you cannot view this site.

Introduction to tree ring dating